Data

General Issues
Environment
Governance & Political Institutions
Social Welfare
Specific Topics
Climate Change
Energy Conservation
Environmental Conservation
Location
44 Richmond Road
England
BN11 1HS
United Kingdom
Scope of Influence
Regional
Links
Adur and Worthing Climate Assembly Recommendations Report.
Time Limited or Repeated?
Repeated over time
Purpose/Goal
Research
Make, influence, or challenge decisions of government and public bodies
Make, influence, or challenge decisions of private organizations
Approach
Co-governance
Direct decision making
Research
Spectrum of Public Participation
Involve
Total Number of Participants
43
Open to All or Limited to Some?
Mixed
Recruitment Method for Limited Subset of Population
Random Sample
Targeted Demographics
Racial/Ethnic Groups
Men
Women
General Types of Methods
Collaborative approaches
Direct democracy
Participant-led meetings
General Types of Tools/Techniques
Facilitate decision-making
Propose and/or develop policies, ideas, and recommendations
Inform, educate and/or raise awareness
Face-to-Face, Online, or Both
Online

CASE

Adur & Worthing Climate Assembly

May 9, 2022 Nina Sartor
May 9, 2022 j.carrick
April 25, 2022 reneadebonojo
General Issues
Environment
Governance & Political Institutions
Social Welfare
Specific Topics
Climate Change
Energy Conservation
Environmental Conservation
Location
44 Richmond Road
England
BN11 1HS
United Kingdom
Scope of Influence
Regional
Links
Adur and Worthing Climate Assembly Recommendations Report.
Time Limited or Repeated?
Repeated over time
Purpose/Goal
Research
Make, influence, or challenge decisions of government and public bodies
Make, influence, or challenge decisions of private organizations
Approach
Co-governance
Direct decision making
Research
Spectrum of Public Participation
Involve
Total Number of Participants
43
Open to All or Limited to Some?
Mixed
Recruitment Method for Limited Subset of Population
Random Sample
Targeted Demographics
Racial/Ethnic Groups
Men
Women
General Types of Methods
Collaborative approaches
Direct democracy
Participant-led meetings
General Types of Tools/Techniques
Facilitate decision-making
Propose and/or develop policies, ideas, and recommendations
Inform, educate and/or raise awareness
Face-to-Face, Online, or Both
Online

Climate Assembly implemented by the Adur and Worthing councils in July 2019.

Problems and Purpose

Adur and Worthing Councils declared a climate emergency in July 2019. They implemented targets of carbon neutrality across Adur and Worthing by 2050 and across the council’s own buildings and operations by 2030. To help them achieve these targets the council decided to engage with the wider community, calling a climate assembly in July 2019 to address the following questions[1]: ‘’How can we in Adur and Worthing collectively tackle climate change and support our places to thrive?’’ and ‘’What does this mean for the way we live and for our local environment?’’ 


 

Background History and Context

Adur and Worthing Climate Assembly was called to demonstrate the council’s commitment and strengthen their response to the climate crisis[2].

The leaders of Worthing Borough Council and Adur District Council (Cllr. Daniel Humphreys Cllr. Neil Perkin, respectively) outlined the assembly’s roles and objectives. Both leaders wanted the climate assembly to acknowledge the importance of the local communities and businesses in making positive contributions to climate change policy-making.

 

Organizing, Supporting, and Funding Entities

Adur and Worthing Climate Assembly was set up jointly by the Worthing Borough Council and Adur District Council. They were supported by the Climate Advisory Group, the Democratic Society, the Sortition Foundation[3].

The Climate Advisory Group was an independent advisory group established to oversee the design and implementation of the Adur and Worthing Climate Assembly. Their role was to provide advice and oversight to ensure that the Adur and Worthing Climate Assembly’s plans, evidence and materials were accurate, balanced and not biased. 

The Democratic Society was commissioned to design and facilitate the Climate Assembly and the Sortition foundation was commissioned to recruit the assembly members. 


Participant Recruitment and Selection

The Sortition Foundation recruited the assembly members through a two-staged lottery. First, 8,000 invitations were given to randomly selected households in the areas of the Adur District and the Worthing Borough[4]. In response, over 400 individuals registered their interest in being an assembly member. 

Second, 45 assembly members were selected from those that registered an interest in participating, so that the assembly was diverse and represented the populations of Adur and Worthing in terms of gender, age, ethnicity, job and views of climate change. Altogether,  43 of the 45 selected assembly members participated in the assembly.

In recognition of the commitment and time they gave to participating, the members received a £300 thank you gift (as cash or vouchers). 


Methods and Tools Used

The assembly was held over five online sessions between September to December 2020, during which 43 assembly members met to listen to evidence from professional speakers, deliberate and agree recommendations. From this they made recommendations which were presented to the Adur and Worthing Councils on 12 January 2021. 

The Assembly was undertaken fully online, using software, including, Zoom, Miro, Google docs, Google sites, and SurveyMonkey. During the recruitment process, the members were asked about their confidence in using digital tools and their access to devices to ensure full and meaningful participation could be  implemented. Once selected, each member received a one-hour technology introduction session[5].

The Councils were keen to ensure that the participatory experience was comparable to an in-person assembly. The Climate Assembly was designed and facilitated to give the members opportunities to participate in the learning, deliberations and decision-making. The members of the assembly heard and discussed a range of evidence from other residents, community groups and many more before developing their recommendations for tackling climate change.

Five Micro Group sessions were used to facilitate smaller and less formal discussions between each assembly weekend in online breakout rooms, comprising 4 assembly members and a facilitator as meetings were in between each assembly weekend. Through these processes:

The assembly facilitated wider engagement with local residents via surveys to understand their views on climate change and what lifestyle changes they have made to incorporate sustainability. 


What Went On: Process, Interaction, and Participation

Five assembly sessions were undertaken between September and December 2020, were the 43 assembly members listened to evidence from expert speakers, deliberated, and made  recommendations. 

The sessions are outlined below:

Session 1 – 19th September 2020: Getting an understanding of the topic. The first Climate assembly meeting was about the assembly members getting to know each other and understand why the assembly has been called, the background, context and aspirations that are held by the Councils.

Session 2- 10th October 2020: Getting into detail of climate justice and systems.  Members watched a pre-recorded presentation from Judy Ling Wong an Environmental activist which explored the issues of fairness and justice in relation to tackling climate change. The assembly members started documenting their thoughts around the issues of climate change. They explored the symptoms and impacts of climate change and identified the underlying issues.

Session 3- 31st October 2020: Looking at Adur and Worthing – the challenges and opportunities. The assembly members received a presentation from Paul Brewer, Director for Digital, Sustainability and Resources and Francesca Iliffe, Strategic Sustainability Manager. After hearing about what the Councils were doing already in the context of tackling climate change, the members gave feedback on key points in plenary to reflect on what they learnt from the discussions.

Session 4- 21st November 2020: Translating ideas into actions. Assembly members voted on guiding principles via an online poll Zoom. Any draft principles that received less than 50% of support by the assembly were removed. Assembly members then went into breakout groups to start drafting their recommendation statements. The members were brought back together to vote on their top 10 recommendation statements using Slido (each member had 10 votes). 

The results were presented by the facilitator so that the assembly members could think about the actions required; 28 recommendations received 15% of votes or more; and six recommendations received less than 15% of votes and so were not progressed into the afternoon session. 

Session 5 – 5th December 2020: Redefining proposals and making recommendations. Assembly members were allocated to breakout groups continue working on developing their recommendations. They reviewed the feedback and comments by other members and by documented positive and negative impacts of each the recommendation. 

Afterwards there was a final vote on their recommendations where members voted to support or oppose each recommendation. All 19 recommendations received support (over 50% of votes cast), with 18 receiving strong support (over 75% of votes cast). 

The assembly members worked with the 18 recommendations which received strong support in break out groups, considering the importance of each recommendation.  Finally, the assembly members prepared short presentations about each of the recommendations ready for feedback and reflection from councillors of Adur and Worthing Councils.

The 18 recommendations were grouped into six themes:

1.     Green spaces and Biodiversity: Support the restoration of natural kelp - promoting the positives and managing the negative effects on the environment and the local community. 

2.     Information and education: The Councils publish widely and acted upon their carbon audit, share learning, enabling local businesses and organisations to do the same so the whole community are more aware and are able to make informed choices. 

3.     Green finance and energy: Adur & Worthing Councils will  support the setup of a local community energy company for green and affordable energy which benefits everyone in our area and is well-promoted and advertised.

4.     Planning: Adur and Worthing Councils to encourage and promote planning and development that exceed national standards.  Must implement the highest standards of biodiversity and sustainability and protect environmental standards from compromise by other policy areas or changes. Using enforcements that do not meet those standards. 

5.     Transport: Promote more cycling by implementing clear and safe travel routes. Ensure cycle safety training for all ages and abilities and ensure legislative changes are pursued to promote access e.g. through parks

6.     Waste Reduction and Recycling: The Councils should set up, in cooperating  with the community, more projects like Repair Cafes. Introducing hubs for upcycling, repairing, art creation and deliver training to provide skills in repairing/recycling. 


Influence, Outcomes, and Effects

Analysis and Lessons Learned

See Also

https://www.adur-worthing.gov.uk/media/Media,159368,smxx.pdf

https://www.adur-worthing.gov.uk/climate-assembly/

References

[1] Adur-worthing.gov.uk. 2020.(online) Available at: https://www.adur-worthing.gov.uk/media/Media,159368,smxx.pdf

 [2] Adur-worthing.gov.uk. 2020. (online) Available at: https://www.adur-worthing.gov.uk/media/Media,159368,smxx.pdf

 [3] Adur-worthing.gov.uk. 2020. (online) Available at: https://www.adur-worthing.gov.uk/media/Media,159368,smxx.pdf

[4] Adur-worthing.gov.uk. 2020. Adur & Worthing Climate Assembly - Adur & Worthing Councils. (online) Available at: https://www.adur-worthing.gov.uk/climate-assembly/

 [5] Adur-worthing.gov.uk. 2020. (online) Available at: https://www.adur-worthing.gov.uk/media/Media,159368,smxx.pdf

  

External Links


Notes