Food for Health - Building a Healthy Food System in NYC

Food for Health - Building a Healthy Food System in NYC

English

Note:  This is incomplete. You can help Participedia by adding to it. 

 

Problems and Purpose

NY Faith & Justice, Faith Leaders for Environmental Justice, and the Riverside Church partnered to address concerns about food and health disparities in New York City. The Food, Faith, and Health Disparities Summit was held to bring residents from all five boroughs together for a day of dialogue and prioritizing actions. After the summit, six action teams formed to address concerns about food and health. The action teams focused primarity on connecting residents with elected officials and local businesses, educating the public around the federal Farm Bill, and developing incentives for people to make healthy food choices. Six months later, four of the action teams were still working to change policy and engage the community around these issues.

History

According to a 2009 study by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, 23.5 million people lack access to a supermarket within a mile of their home. An estimated 3 million people in New York City live in "food deserts." (Food deserts are areas with limited access to affordable and nutritious foods, and are often located in low-income neighborhoods.)

African American and Latino communities are disproportionately affected by the lack of fresh food. African Americans are nearly four times as likely as whites to live in a food desert. Predominantly white neighborhoods have about three times the number of chain supermarkets as predominantly Latino areas.

Originating Entities and Funding

The summit was organized collaboratively between the NY Faith & Justice, Faith Leaders for Environmental Justice, and the Riverside Church. 

Participant Recruitment and Selection

Methods and Tools Used

Deliberation, Decisions and Public Interaction

Influence, Outcomes and Effects

After the summit, six action teams formed to address concerns about food and health. The action teams focused primarity on connecting residents with elected officials and local businesses, educating the public around the federal Farm Bill, and developing incentives for people to make healthy food choices. Six months later, four of the action teams were still working to change policy and engage the community around these issues.

As part of their work to connect the community engagement process with policy change, some of the community leaders involved with this initiative sent a memorandum to the mayor's office to be incorporated into PlaNY, a 25-year plan launched my Mayor Bloomberg in 2007 to make New York City more sustainable.

Analysis and Lessons Learned

 

External Links

https://bronxhealthreach.blogspot.ca/2010/09/food-faith-and-health-dispa...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4lFNAeZbgkA

 
NY Faith & Justice, Faith Leaders for Environmental Justice, and the Riverside Church partnered to host a Food, Faith, and Health Disparities Summit using Everyday Democracy's dialogue-to-change process. Over 150 New Yorkers from all five boroughs convened for a day of dialogue and prioritizing actions. This link takes you to two videos; "NYC Addresses Food and Health Disparities" describes the work leading up to and immediately following the summit. "Taking Food Justice into Their Own Hands" describes the work of four action teams that emerged from the summit. Director and editor: Rebecca Reyes, Videographer: Janee Woods Weber. Uploaded on Aug 29, 2011

Case Data

Location

Geolocation: 
Institute for Family Health
16 E. 16th St. 6th floor
10003 New York , NY
United States
40° 44' 12.8472" N, 73° 59' 30.0696" W
New York US

History

Start Date: 
Thursday, September 30, 2010
End Date: 
Friday, April 29, 2011
Ongoing: 
No
Number of Meeting Days: 
[no data entered]

Participants

Total Number of Participants: 
150
Targeted Participants (Demographics): 
Targeted Participants (Public Roles): 

Organizers

Who paid for the project or initiative?: 
[no data entered]
Who was primarily responsible for organizing the initiative?: 
Who else supported the initiative? : 
Faith Leaders for Environmental Justice, Riverside Church

Resources

Total Budget: 
[no data entered]
Average Annual Budget: 
[no data entered]
Number of Full-Time Staff: 
[no data entered]
Number of Part-Time Staff: 
[no data entered]
Staff Type: 
[no data entered]
Number of Volunteers: 
[no data entered]

Discussions

No discussions have been started yet.