Data

Face-to-Face, Online, or Both?
Face-to-Face
General Type of Method
Collaborative approaches
Deliberative and dialogic process
Community development, organizing, and mobilization
Typical Purpose
Make, influence, or challenge decisions of government and public bodies
Deliver goods & services
Develop the civic capacities of individuals, communities, and/or civil society organizations
Spectrum of Public Participation
Collaborate
Files
Building cooperative learning to address alcohol and other drug abuse in Mpumalanga South Africa a participatory action research process.pdf
Links
Building cooperative learning to address alcohol and other drug abuse

METHOD

Building cooperative learning to address alcohol and other drug abuse

March 23, 2020 lucia.dambruoso
Face-to-Face, Online, or Both?
Face-to-Face
General Type of Method
Collaborative approaches
Deliberative and dialogic process
Community development, organizing, and mobilization
Typical Purpose
Make, influence, or challenge decisions of government and public bodies
Deliver goods & services
Develop the civic capacities of individuals, communities, and/or civil society organizations
Spectrum of Public Participation
Collaborate
Files
Building cooperative learning to address alcohol and other drug abuse in Mpumalanga South Africa a participatory action research process.pdf
Links
Building cooperative learning to address alcohol and other drug abuse

Alcohol and other drug (AOD) abuse is a major Public Health challenge... how can communities be involved in finding solutions?

Problems and Purpose

Alcohol and other drug (AOD) abuse is a major public health challenge disproportionately affecting marginalised communities. Involving communities in the development of responses can contribute to acceptable solutions.


Origins and Development

This research was based on the premise that involving affected communities in the development of responses to complex public health issues can contribute to acceptable, sustainable, equity-oriented responses. While community participation is a key issue on national and international agendas, the concept remains poorly understood, especially at operational levels and communities grappling with AOD are rarely engaged in the development of responses. Similarly, while research and intervention development are well-informed through processes involving researchers, professionals, and community members in problem definition, design, and analysis, AOD often is dealt with scientifically by quantitative methodology, where participation is not usually called for.


Participant Recruitment and Selection

PAR was progressed with 48 community stakeholders across three rural villages in the MRC/Wits Agincourt Health and Socio Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) in Mpumalanga, South Africa. A series of workshops explored community-nominated topics, systematised lived experience into shared accounts and considered actions to address problems identified. Photovoice was also used to generate visual evidence. Narrative and visual data were thematically analysed, situated within practice frameworks, and learning and adaption elicited.


How it Works: Process, Interaction, and Decision-Making

AOD abuse was identified as a topic of high priority. It was understood as an entrenched social problem with destructive effects. Biopsychosocial impacts were mapped and related to unemployment, poverty, stress, peer pressure, criminal activity, corruption, and a proliferating number of taverns. Integrated action agendas were developed focussed on demand, supply, and harm reduction underpinned by shared responsibility among community, state, and non-state actors. Community stakeholders appreciated systematising and sharing knowledge, taking active roles, developing new skills in planning and public speaking, and progressing shared accountability processes. Expectations required sensitive management, however.

Influence, Outcomes, and Effects

There is significant willingness and capacity among community stakeholders to work in partnership with authorities to address priority health concerns. As a process, participation can help to raise and frame issues, which may help to better inform action and encourage shared responsibility. Broader understandings of participation require reference to, and ultimately transfer of power towards, those most directly affected, developing community voice as continuous processes within social and political environments.


Analysis and Lessons Learned

 In terms of learning, adapting, and building the process, flexible and inclusive spaces can build confidence and capacity among those most directly affected as a basis from which to raise and frame issues, which may help to inform action to enhance service delivery and, more generally, encourage shared responsibility for health with decision-makers and other stakeholders. More generally, broader understandings of participation require explicit reference to, and ultimately transfer of power towards, those most directly affected. Our learning and adaptation prioritise flexible and inclusive processes, developing community voice as continuous processes within social and political environments. 


See Also

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/16549716.2020.1726722#.Xl1bwtN3P0Q.twitter

www.vapar.org


External Links

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/16549716.2020.1726722#.Xl1bwtN3P0Q.twitter

© 2020 Oladeiende et al. https://doi.org/10.1080/16549716.2020.1726722 Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.