Data

General Issues
Science & Technology
Health
Specific Topics
Biomedical Research & Development
Agricultural Biotechnology
Collections
Transnational Citizens' Assemblies
Scope of Influence
Multinational
Components of this Case
Australian Citizens' Jury on Genome Editing
Australian Citizens' Jury on Genome Editing
Parent of this Case
Australian Citizens' Jury on Genome Editing
Links
Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing
Global Citizen's Deliberation on Genome Editing
Videos
Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing
Start Date
Ongoing
Yes
Purpose/Goal
Make, influence, or challenge decisions of government and public bodies
Approach
Civil society building
Research
General Types of Methods
Deliberative and dialogic process
Participatory arts
General Types of Tools/Techniques
Propose and/or develop policies, ideas, and recommendations
Facilitate dialogue, discussion, and/or deliberation
Inform, educate and/or raise awareness
Specific Methods, Tools & Techniques
Citizens’ Assembly
Citizens' Jury
Legality
Yes
Facilitators
Yes
Face-to-Face, Online, or Both
Both
Types of Interaction Among Participants
Discussion, Dialogue, or Deliberation
Listen/Watch as Spectator
Ask & Answer Questions
Information & Learning Resources
Expert Presentations
Video Presentations
Written Briefing Materials
Communication of Insights & Outcomes
Traditional Media
Independent Media
Public Report
Primary Organizer/Manager
Centre for Deliberative Democracy and Global Governance
Type of Organizer/Manager
Academic Institution
Staff
Yes

CASE

Global Citizens' Assembly on Genome Editing

July 25, 2022 Paul Emiljanowicz
July 4, 2022 Joyce Chen
July 2, 2022 Joyce Chen
August 2, 2021 Lucy J Parry, Participedia Team
General Issues
Science & Technology
Health
Specific Topics
Biomedical Research & Development
Agricultural Biotechnology
Collections
Transnational Citizens' Assemblies
Scope of Influence
Multinational
Components of this Case
Australian Citizens' Jury on Genome Editing
Australian Citizens' Jury on Genome Editing
Parent of this Case
Australian Citizens' Jury on Genome Editing
Links
Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing
Global Citizen's Deliberation on Genome Editing
Videos
Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing
Start Date
Ongoing
Yes
Purpose/Goal
Make, influence, or challenge decisions of government and public bodies
Approach
Civil society building
Research
General Types of Methods
Deliberative and dialogic process
Participatory arts
General Types of Tools/Techniques
Propose and/or develop policies, ideas, and recommendations
Facilitate dialogue, discussion, and/or deliberation
Inform, educate and/or raise awareness
Specific Methods, Tools & Techniques
Citizens’ Assembly
Citizens' Jury
Legality
Yes
Facilitators
Yes
Face-to-Face, Online, or Both
Both
Types of Interaction Among Participants
Discussion, Dialogue, or Deliberation
Listen/Watch as Spectator
Ask & Answer Questions
Information & Learning Resources
Expert Presentations
Video Presentations
Written Briefing Materials
Communication of Insights & Outcomes
Traditional Media
Independent Media
Public Report
Primary Organizer/Manager
Centre for Deliberative Democracy and Global Governance
Type of Organizer/Manager
Academic Institution
Staff
Yes

The Global Citizens' Assembly on Genome Editing is a deliberative event that will synthesize inputs from several national level deliberative processes on different applications of genome editing and provide global and national reports on the future uses genome editing. Specifically, it will bring together between 24–100 participants for 5 days to discuss the moral and ethical dimensions of genome editing; after hearing presentations from scientists, ethicists, and stakeholders, participants will develop recommendations surrounding genome editing governance.

Problems and Purpose

Gene-editing technologies—in organisms ranging from humans to plants—have made incredible scientific leaps in recent years. However, distrust of such technology has grown as well, raising questions of gene-editing’s applications, scope for regulation, and ethical future. As such, the Centre for Deliberative Democracy and Global Governance at the University of Canberra, alongside its international network of research partners, is currently working to convene the Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. The assembly’s objective is to ignite dialogues on genome editing worldwide, as well as form “global principles” that will guide how gene-editing technologies are to be used moving forward. [1]

Background History and Context

As public distrust of gene-editing technologies grew, so too did demand for a global dialogue regarding genome editing—a dialogue that would facilitate “meaningful discussion on complex technologies and moral disagreements,” as well as place the public’s views and opinions at the forefront. [2] 


The Centre for Deliberative Democracy and Global Governance at the University of Canberra are working to convene the Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing to address this demand. Before the Global Citizens’ Assembly takes place, national deliberations in countries including Australia, the United States, Brazil, France, China, and more will occur. Some participants in these national deliberations will then participate in the Global Citizens’ Assembly, which will bring together between 24–100 participants from countries around the world most deeply affected by gene editing technologies. Across 5 days of discussion on global genome editing governance, participants will hear from scientists, ethicists, and civil society stakeholders before forming recommendations that will be forwarded to the United Nations Secretary-General, the Director-Generals of the World Health Organization and Food and Agriculture Organization, to governmental ministers and departments worldwide, and other relevant stakeholders in various industrial, civil, and academic fields. [3] [4] 


To facilitate further dialogue creation, the Global Citizens’ Assembly will be part of a three-part scientific documentary; public viewing of this documentary will help the Global Citizens’ Assembly’s organizers test its “deliberative diffusion effects.” [5] [6]

Organizing, Supporting, and Funding Entities

The Centre for Deliberative Democracy and Global Governance at the University of Canberra is the organization at the forefront of the Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. Specifically, John Dryzek, Simon Niemeyer and Nicole Curato from the Centre for Deliberative Democracy and Global Governance at the University of Canberra; Dianne Nicol from the Centre for Law and Genetics at the University of Tasmania; Sonya Pemberton from Genepool Productions in Melbourne, Australia; and Antoine Vergne from Missions Publiques comprise the full Project Management Team of the Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. 


The Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing is also partnering with Genepool Productions to produce a three-part scientific documentary; public viewing of this documentary will help the Global Citizens’ Assembly’s organizers test its “deliberative diffusion effects.” [7] [8]

Participant Recruitment and Selection

In an article published in Science discussing the importance of the Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing, several scientists on the organizing team of the Global Citizens’ Assembly noted the importance of convening a representative sample of participants from around the world in terms of nationality, age, religion, educational attainment, gender, and cultural background. However, no further information could be found at the time of writing. [9] [10]

Methods and Tools Used

Citizens’ Juries — used at some national deliberations, including in the UK and Australia.

What Went On: Process, Interaction, and Participation

Before the Global Citizens’ Assembly takes place, national deliberations in countries including Australia, the United States, Brazil, France, China, and more will occur. These national deliberative cases will be informed by relevant, local expertise, as well as international expertise curated by the Global Observatory for Gene Editing (a global network of interdisciplinary researchers on the subject). 


Some participants in these national deliberations will then participate in the Global Citizens’ Assembly, which will bring together between 24–100 participants from countries around the world most deeply affected by gene editing technologies. Across 5 days of discussion on global genome editing governance, participants will hear from scientists, ethicists, and civil society stakeholders before forming recommendations that will be forwarded to the United Nations Secretary-General, the Director-Generals of the World Health Organization and Food and Agriculture Organization, to governmental ministers and departments worldwide, and other relevant stakeholders in various industrial, civil, and academic fields. [11] 


To facilitate further dialogue creation, the Global Citizens’ Assembly will be part of a three-part scientific documentary; screening this documentary in various countries will help the Global Citizens’ Assembly’s organizers gauge how well the viewing experience replicates the deliberative effects of actual participation. [12] [13]

Influence, Outcomes, and Effects

The recommendations of The Global Citizens' Assembly on Genome Editing will be forwarded to the United Nations Secretary-General, the Director-Generals of the World Health Organization and Food and Agriculture Organization, to governmental ministers and departments worldwide, and other relevant stakeholders in various industrial, civil, and academic fields. [14]

Analysis and Lessons Learned

At the time of writing, no further information could be found.

See Also

References


[1] Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. “The Issue.” Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. https://www.globalca.org/about.

[2] Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. “The Issue.” Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. https://www.globalca.org/about.

[3] Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. “The Issue.” Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. https://www.globalca.org/about.

[4] Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. “Project Management Team.” Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. https://www.globalca.org/theteam.

[5] https://www.globalca.org/theteam

[6] Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. “The Issue.” Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. https://www.globalca.org/about.

[7] Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. “Project Management Team.” Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. https://www.globalca.org/theteam.

[8] Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. “The Issue.” Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. https://www.globalca.org/about

[9 Curato, Nicole and Simon Niemeyer. "Why we need a global citizens’ assembly on gene editing.” The Conversation. https://theconversation.com/why-we-need-a-global-citizens-assembly-on-gene-editing-146398

[10] Dryzek, John et al. “Global citizen deliberation on genome editing.” Science. https://arep.med.harvard.edu/pdf/Dryzek_2020.pdf

[11] Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. “The Issue.” Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. https://www.globalca.org/about.

[12] Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. “Project Management Team.” Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. https://www.globalca.org/theteam.

[13] Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. “The Issue.” Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. https://www.globalca.org/about.

[14] Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. “The Issue.” Global Citizens’ Assembly on Genome Editing. https://www.globalca.org/about.

External Links

Notes