Data

Face-to-Face, Online, or Both?
Both
General Type of Method
Community development, organizing, and mobilization
Deliberative and dialogic process
Participant-led meetings
Spectrum of Public Participation
Inform
Collections
Public Participation for Racial Justice
Open to All or Limited to Some?
Mixed
Recruitment Method for Limited Subset of Population
Captive Sample
Types of Interaction Among Participants
Discussion, Dialogue, or Deliberation
Formal Testimony
Ask & Answer Questions
Facilitation
Yes
Decision Methods
Idea Generation
General Agreement/Consensus
Level of Polarization This Method Can Handle
High polarization
Level of Complexity This Method Can Handle
Moderate Complexity

METHOD

TRUTH AND RECONCILIATION COMMISSIONS (TRCs)

November 11, 2021 Patrick L Scully, Participedia Team
November 1, 2021 Oyinade Adekunle
Face-to-Face, Online, or Both?
Both
General Type of Method
Community development, organizing, and mobilization
Deliberative and dialogic process
Participant-led meetings
Spectrum of Public Participation
Inform
Collections
Public Participation for Racial Justice
Open to All or Limited to Some?
Mixed
Recruitment Method for Limited Subset of Population
Captive Sample
Types of Interaction Among Participants
Discussion, Dialogue, or Deliberation
Formal Testimony
Ask & Answer Questions
Facilitation
Yes
Decision Methods
Idea Generation
General Agreement/Consensus
Level of Polarization This Method Can Handle
High polarization
Level of Complexity This Method Can Handle
Moderate Complexity

Truth and Reconciliation Commissions are commissions led by state and non-state actors involved in implementing non-violent constructive dialogue between victims and perpetrators of human violations and violence to initiate and achieve healing and reconciliation.

Problems and Purpose

Racism and racial injustice have been a part of human history instigated by the beliefs, attitudes, and actions resulting from categorizing individuals and groups according to phenotype (physical appearance), heritage, or culture. At its extremes, this has included genocide, slavery, and the colonization of indigenous people.[1] The history of some societies features racial injustices that involve gross human violations and armed conflicts. This has resulted in harm (physically and mentally), destruction of properties, and death. Subsequently creating rifts or disunity between parties involved, subsequently hindering the growth of citizens and the development of societies. Also, “the effects of historical trauma are intergenerationally transmitted even as the structural mechanisms that created them remain in place, creating a plurality of disadvantage for present-day generations.”[2]

The impacts of racial injustices impede development in societies; as a result, the influence of TRCs cannot be undermined in addressing the historical legacy of racial injustice and finding ways to move forward. TRCs as global human rights interventions seek to transform communities affected by oppression and violence through restorative justice principles.[3] The main objective of TRCs is to foster reconciliation rather than retributive justice (different from a court-like structure that emphasizes punishment). 

Origins and Development

Since the first well-known Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Argentina in 1983, TRCs have been visible in diverse forms across various continents. Over fifty Truth and Reconciliation Commissions are recorded.   In 1995, The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of South Africa was identified as the first commission to hold public hearings in which both victims and perpetrators were heard.[4]

TRCs have since been internationally acclaimed as an innovative model for building peace and fostering the accountability of actors involved in human violations.

Participant Recruitment and Selection

Every country has a unique participant selection and recruitment process. The selection and number of participants are dependent on the case being treated (historical event of human violations and violence) and the location. Three groups are involved- victims, perpetrators, and the government. The perpetrators are classified into five: individual perpetrators, group perpetrators, corporate perpetrators, and government perpetrators. 

The activities of TRCs are guided and directed by Commissioners selected through an open countrywide nomination process and publicly interviewed by an independent selection panel comprising of representatives of the government, civil societies, and religious bodies. They delegate researchers, investigators, and statement takers to help collect extensive detailed information from victims, perpetrators, and witnesses.

In sharing their experiences and roles in the historical event, these groups engage in interviews, provide statements, and offer evidence. To ease communication, testifiers were permitted to communicate in whatever language was most convenient.

How it Works: Process, Interaction, and Decision-Making

The process takes place within a minimum of one year but is open to extension based on commissioners’ requests. The process entails uncovering the truth, identifying the culprits, analyzing the extent of abuses, and fostering healing and reconciliation. The crimes considered are classified into three -Egregious Domestic Crimes, Gross Violations of Human Rights Law, Serious Humanitarian Law Violations. Some of the Egregious Domestic Crimes include sexual assault, fraud, murder, misappropriation of public funds, and kidnapping. In most cases, the Gross Violations of Human Rights Law committed by state actors include enslavement, genocide, torture, sexual slavery, unlawful prosecution, and imprisonment. Lastly, Serious Humanitarian Law Violations include mutilation, hostage-taking, terrorism, illegal executions, child labor, cruel treatment, and torture. 

This commences with information gathering through interviews, statement-taking by victims, perpetrators, and witnesses. Individual and thematic hearings follow this. Counseling and psychological aid are accessible before, during, and after the hearings, recognizing the sensitivity of the process. Likewise, protective measures were taken to conceal children’s identities, such as the absence of media or video coverage. A witness protection program is set up to handle trauma, stigmatization, neglect, shame, ostracization, and above all, threats to life. 

The next step entails investigation and validation of testimonies by the Inquiry Unit. Not limited to this, this truth-seeking process involves research of data and from various sources. This ensures the construction of an impartial historical record of the past; and aid in drafting a reparations policy.

The perpetrators confess their atrocities by detailing their involvement in human violations and seeking the forgiveness of victims and the country. In most cases, the offer of amnesty to perpetrators increases truthful recollections and testimonies, promoting openness and transparency. This process offers an avenue of healing for victims. 

TRCs final task involves the release of a final report, including recommendations to sustain unity, peace, reconciliation, and most importantly, prevent a re-occurrence of past events concerned. TRCs as democratic innovations tackle human rights violations by highlighting the causes and proffering recommendations to aid reconciliation and peaceful co-existence amongst all parties involved.

Analysis and Lessons Learned

TRCs’ widely acclaimed acceptance and presence in various societies can be attributed to the methods implemented. They ensure that their actions are guided by the objective- “investigating, identifying the antecedents and determining responsibility for egregious domestic crimes, gross human rights violations, and serious humanitarian law violations.”[5]

TRCs have been faulted for rehashing the trauma of victims, which has psychological and emotional impacts. Some victims prefer to avoid recounting their gruesome experiences. Also, the level of influence is restricted by the bureaucratic process prevalent in various countries. In some cases, TRCs’ influence halt at the release of a final report without implementing recommendations provided in the report. This is otherwise known as “TRC calls to action,” which, as the name suggests, tasks the government to implement recommendations to offer lasting solutions to issues raised. 

The shortcomings of TRCs do not take away from their importance in eliciting “admissions of wrongdoing and public apologies and tangible steps towards a more equitable community.”[6] The prevalence of horrific human violations, racial injustice, and armed conflicts affirms the need for Truth and Reconciliation Commissions. That is, “As long as unresolved historic injustices continue to fester in the world, there will be a demand for truth commissions.”[7]

See Also

Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Liberia

References 

[1] Maria Svetaz et al, “The Traumatic Impact of Racism and Discrimination On Young People and How To Talk About It,” in Reaching Teens: Strength-Based, Trauma0Sensitive, Resilience-Building Communication Strategies Rooted In The Positive Youth Development by Kenneth Ginsburg and Zachary McClain (Eds.) https://www.seattlechildrens.org/globalassets/documents/clinics/diversity/the-traumatic-impact-of-racism-and-discrimination-on-young-people-and-how-to-talk-about-it.pdf

[2]Ibid.

[3] David Androff, “A case study of a grassroots truth and reconciliation commission from a community practice perspective,” Journal of Social Work (2016), Vol. 18(3) 273–287, https://doi-org.libaccess.lib.mcmaster.ca/10.1177/1468017316654361

[4] Desmond Tutu, “Truth and Reconciliation Commission, South Africa,” https://www.britannica.com/topic/Truth-and-Reconciliation-Commission-South-Africa

[5]Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Liberia,” Vol I: Findings and Determinations, 25. 

[6] Larry Schooler, “After Floyd killing, we need a truth and reconciliation commission on race and policing,” June 14, 2020, USA Today,  https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2020/06/07/floyd-killing-truth-reconciliation-commission-race-police-column/3147541001/

[7] Bonny Ibhawoh, “Do Truth and Reconciliation Commissions Heal Divided Nations,” January 23, 2019, The Conversation, https://theconversation.com/do-truth-and-reconciliation-commissions-heal-divided-nations-109925