Data

Links
https://www.tubantia.nl/enschede/enschedeers-verleiden-raadsleden-tijdens-zesde-motiemarkt~a11cd51a/
http://www.leithchooses.net/category/participatory-budgeting
Facilitation
No
Scope of Implementation
name:scope_of_influence-key:local
Level of Polarization This Method Can Handle
name:level_polarization-key:not_polarized

METHOD

Motiemarkt "Motion-Market"

First Submitted By Scott Fletcher, Participedia Team

Most Recent Changes By Lucy J Parry, Participedia Team

Links
https://www.tubantia.nl/enschede/enschedeers-verleiden-raadsleden-tijdens-zesde-motiemarkt~a11cd51a/
http://www.leithchooses.net/category/participatory-budgeting
Facilitation
No
Scope of Implementation
name:scope_of_influence-key:local
Level of Polarization This Method Can Handle
name:level_polarization-key:not_polarized

Motiemarkt, literally translated means "Motion-Market" which reflects the unique rotational presentation structure of this participatory budgeting method.

Note: the following entry is incomplete. You can help Participedia by adding to it. 

Problems and Purpose

The purpose of the motion market is to allow citizens and civil society groups to present their own ideas and convince elected politicians to include them in their budget. The motiemarkt functions like an open market with council members (or other decision-making individuals) 'shopping' at stalls. If a council member finds an agreeable project, they will sign a form committing them to either adopt the idea into a motion or amendment, or to allocate a portion of the PB pool to their project. The public voting/endorsement process helps to ensure that both council members and citizens commit to the projects implementation. 

Origins and Development

The first ‘motion market’ was organized on the 31st of October 2011 and it has since become an annual event in the Netherlands, effectively institutionalized within the budgeting process. The technique has also been employed in Leith during their annual '£eith Decides' PB event.

Participant Recruitment and Selection

Participants are generally self selected; citizens and civil society organizations could, individually or in groups, register for the event in order to reserve a table for their project. However, registration remains open until the morning of the event so most are able to participate even at the last minute.

How it Works: Process, Interaction, and Decision-Making

The motion market is usually employed in place of private project submissions. In some PB cycles, councilors will annouce a call for funding ideas from the public which are then advertised through community meetings, print media, and online resources. The Motion-Market, on the other hand, allows citizens and civil society groups to present these ideas to the public and convince elected politicians to adopt or fund them. Citizens and civil society organizations presented ideas on the ‘market’, with every group having their own stall. Members of the city council or citizen voters (depending on the allocation of decision-making powers within the PB framework) walk around in a shopping manner, looking at the ideas and talking to their supporters. Every time a match is established between a voter and the initiator(s) of an idea, they sign a form committing them to (in the case of a policy suggestion) signing the idea into a motion or amendment or, (in the case of a funding proposal), allocating a portion of the PB pool. The forms signed at the market when an idea is adopted look very similar to a legal contract, and are supposed to ensure that both council members and citizens commit to further steps. 

Influence, Outcomes, and Effects

Know what outcomes and effects this method typically has? Help us complete this section! 

Analysis and Lessons Learned

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See Also

Enschede "Motiemarkt" Participatory Budgeting (Netherlands) 

References

External Links

https://www.tubantia.nl/enschede/enschedeers-verleiden-raadsleden-tijdens-zesde-motiemarkt~a11cd51a/

http://www.leithchooses.net/category/participatory-budgeting

Notes