Data

Face-to-Face, Online, or Both?
Face-to-Face
General Type of Method
Deliberative and dialogic process
Public meetings
Typical Purpose
Make, influence, or challenge decisions of government and public bodies
Spectrum of Public Participation
Inform
Links
English Communication for Scientists - Panel Discussions
Open to All or Limited to Some?
mixed
Recruitment Method for Limited Subset of Population
Not Applicable
Number of Participants
Medium size groups
Large groups
Types of Interaction Among Participants
Ask & Answer Questions
Listen/Watch as Spectator
Discussion, Dialogue, or Deliberation
Facilitation
Yes
Decision Methods
Not Applicable
Level of Polarization This Method Can Handle
Moderate polarization

METHOD

Panel Discussion

Face-to-Face, Online, or Both?
Face-to-Face
General Type of Method
Deliberative and dialogic process
Public meetings
Typical Purpose
Make, influence, or challenge decisions of government and public bodies
Spectrum of Public Participation
Inform
Links
English Communication for Scientists - Panel Discussions
Open to All or Limited to Some?
mixed
Recruitment Method for Limited Subset of Population
Not Applicable
Number of Participants
Medium size groups
Large groups
Types of Interaction Among Participants
Ask & Answer Questions
Listen/Watch as Spectator
Discussion, Dialogue, or Deliberation
Facilitation
Yes
Decision Methods
Not Applicable
Level of Polarization This Method Can Handle
Moderate polarization
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A panel discussion involves a group of people discussing a topic in front of an audience. Panels are usually interactive, asking, discussing, debating or responding to questions from audience members. Panels are typically moderated but are less formal than a debate.

Problems and Purpose

Panel discussions usually involve a number of experts speaking on a topic in front of a live audience. The panel format is almost always moderated, allowing for multiple speakers to share their point of view, discuss or debate in a respectful manner, and to interact with audience members. Most panels are discussions rather than debates and they are generally intended to educate the audience rather than 'win' points or adherents. According to Dr. Jean-luc Doumont, "Panels are teams. Whether or not panelists agree on all issues, they can and should work together to create an interesting discussion for the audience."[1]

Origins and Development

Participant Recruitment and Selection

How it Works: Process, Interaction, and Decision-Making

Influence, Outcomes, and Effects

Analysis and Lessons Learned

See Also

Q&A Session

References

[1] "Panel Discussions," in Doumont, J., ed. English Communication for Scientists. Cambridge, MA: NPG Education, 2010. Available at https://www.nature.com/scitable/ebooks/english-communication-for-scientists-14053993/126085065

External Links

https://speakermagazine.com/7-tips-to-take-your-panel-discussion-from-terrible-to-terrific/

Notes

Lead image: "Panel discussion Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting 2012" Markus Pössel [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons