Data

General Issues
Economics
Governance & Political Institutions
Planning & Development
Specific Topics
Budget - Local
Location
La Plata
Argentina
Scope of Influence
name:scope_of_influence-key:citytown
Links
https://presupuestoparticipativo.laplata.gob.ar/#/
Start Date
Ongoing
Yes
Time Limited or Repeated?
Repeated over time
Purpose/Goal
Make, influence, or challenge decisions of government and public bodies
Approach
Co-governance
Spectrum of Public Participation
Empower
Open to All or Limited to Some?
Open to All
Legality
Yes
Facilitators
Yes
Face-to-Face, Online, or Both
Both
Types of Interaction Among Participants
Discussion, Dialogue, or Deliberation
Express Opinions/Preferences Only
Information & Learning Resources
Written Briefing Materials
Decision Methods
Voting
Communication of Insights & Outcomes
Traditional Media
New Media
Public Report
Type of Organizer/Manager
Local Government
Funder
City of La Plata
Type of Funder
Local Government
Staff
Yes
Evidence of Impact
Yes
Implementers of Change
Elected Public Officials
Appointed Public Servants
Experts

CASE

La Plata Multi-Channel Participatory Budgeting (Argentina)

First Submitted By Kevin Um

Most Recent Changes By Scott Fletcher, Participedia Team

General Issues
Economics
Governance & Political Institutions
Planning & Development
Specific Topics
Budget - Local
Location
La Plata
Argentina
Scope of Influence
name:scope_of_influence-key:citytown
Links
https://presupuestoparticipativo.laplata.gob.ar/#/
Start Date
Ongoing
Yes
Time Limited or Repeated?
Repeated over time
Purpose/Goal
Make, influence, or challenge decisions of government and public bodies
Approach
Co-governance
Spectrum of Public Participation
Empower
Open to All or Limited to Some?
Open to All
Legality
Yes
Facilitators
Yes
Face-to-Face, Online, or Both
Both
Types of Interaction Among Participants
Discussion, Dialogue, or Deliberation
Express Opinions/Preferences Only
Information & Learning Resources
Written Briefing Materials
Decision Methods
Voting
Communication of Insights & Outcomes
Traditional Media
New Media
Public Report
Type of Organizer/Manager
Local Government
Funder
City of La Plata
Type of Funder
Local Government
Staff
Yes
Evidence of Impact
Yes
Implementers of Change
Elected Public Officials
Appointed Public Servants
Experts

La Plata's participatory budget combined offline and online channels of participation to lower the time costs of exclusively face-to-face, deliberative events. The multi-channel approach has been successful in drawing a larger number of participants from diverse demographics.

Note: a Spanish version of this entry is available at https://participedia.xyz/case/482

Problems and Purpose

The goals of La Plata's Participatory Budget include those most commonly attributed to the method: increased transparency and better and innovative delivery of public services, while simultaneously promoting the participation of citizens in making public decisions.

Where 'traditional' PB initiatives have been criticized for their poor levels of attendence, La Plata sought to combine face-to-face and online modes of participation to lessen the the time costs of lengthy public assemblies and deliberations. Officials hoped that the use of both in-person and remote/online channels of communication would allow the city to the dual benefits of deliberation and inclusive/diverse participation.

Background History and Context

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Organizing, Supporting, and Funding Entities

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Participant Recruitment and Selection

The participatory budgeting process is open to all and various outreach activities were used by organizers to engage with as many people. Door to door campaigning in poor and remote areas and a series of plenary meetings were held (over 200 in 2010) across different areas of the city to draw participants. Total numbers recorded in 2008 (1): 17.686 unique participants (2.9% of the population) 2008 (2): 29.578 unique participants (4.9% of the population) 2009: 44.983 unique participants (7.5% of the population). 45,000 participants were recorded in 2010.

Methods and Tools Used

Participatory Budgeting (PB) can be broadly defined as the participation of citizens in the decision-making process of budget allocation and in the monitoring of public spending. Internationally praised as a good governance policy, the implementation of PB has been associated with desirable outcomes such as reduction of tax delinquency, increased transparency and better and innovative delivery of public services. La Plata's Multi-Channel PB uses an innovative combination of offline and mobile channels to promote the engagement of citizens in the direct allocation of the investment budget of the city. The municipality’s unique participatory design, combining face-to-face deliberation with remote voting (e.g. mobile voting), has produced outstanding results, with over 45.000 participants in 2010.

Deliberations, Decisions, and Public Interaction

La Plata's process is composed of 3 phases:

  1. Face-to-face deliberative meetings are held across the city.
  2. City-wide voting between the options selected during the previous phase. A secure system allows votes to be cast through paper ballots or text messages (SMS).
  3. Projects selected by the citizens are funded and implemented by the city administration. Citizens are encouraged to monitor and support the implementation process.

Influence, Outcomes, and Effects

Implementing Participatory Budgeting and using multiple channels of communication has greatly increased the incentive to participate in political decision-making among La Plata’s citizens. 

Firstly, as with other Participatory Budgeting projects, giving citizens the opportunity to allocate up to Euro 7,6 million of the budget creates an incentive for residents to attend the first stage of deliberative, face-to-face meetings. Unlike the usual monthly Town Halls or Neighbourhood Meetings, Participatory Budgeting forums come with a real chance of pay off: officials have committed the money and have turned over the power to propose and vote on its allocation. As well, La Plata's use of localized meetings (held in over 200 geographic regions and communities in 2010) make the projects under discussion more relevant to residents. Discussing projects at the city-level often draws few participants because many of the projects do not immediately impact them or their neighbourhood.

Secondly, because the time costs associated with face-to-face, deliberative processes inevitably prevent a portion of the population from taking part, La Plata's inclusion of remote/online channels of communications allowed the incentives of participation associated with budget allocation to carry over to those unlikely, unable, or unwilling to attend in-person meetings. While exclusively face-to-face forms of Participatory Budgeting often never even warrent the consideration of those disinclined to political participation, mixed-method PB offering online or remote channels of communication can, at least, increase the potential for these individuals to consider taking part. Indeed, in La Plata, the number of participants in the remote voting process is on average 10 times higher than that of the face-to-face meetings. In short, La Plata's use of additional channels of participation effectivley lowered the time cost of other Participatory Budgeting initiatives.  

Influence on Policy Decisions

Unlike most cases of democratic participation and some cases of Participatory Budgeting, La Plata's PB is not simply another exercise in government consultation. Rather, officials made it clear that citizens were being given complete control over the decision-making process. Before the beginning of the process, city administrators made clear that they would implement all projects proposed and voted on by citizens with the only restriction being the fixed budgetary allowance. That the officials followed through on this promise, quickly funding and implementing the chosen projects, was a great show of faith and almost certainly resulted in greater citizen trust. Such actions are crucial for the continued success of any participatory initiative: by following through on their promise, officials make it more likely that people will participate in future engagements. 

There is also evidence that the initiative has acheived one of the main benefits of participatory budgeting processes: improving the lives of socially and economically marginalized sectors of the population. Since the start of the process, health care services have been prioritized by participants, leading to a 100% increase in health-related funding. The 1% reduction in the city's child mortality rate has been attributed to the improvements in health services.

Analysis and Lessons Learned

The city's dedicated advertising campaign drew attention to the initiative, including, for example, statistics on participation and votes cast - tactics which tap into 'crowd psychology' which holds that the likelihood of an individual performing an action increases in direct proportion to the number of people having taken that action. Either not wanting to be 'left out' or wanting to be part of the 'in crowd', people will align their behaviour with their peers and those around them - in this case, attending a PB meeting or voting for a project. The city also used social (online) and traditional media channels to reach a broad demographic. 

See Also

Participatory Budgeting 

References

Rob Henderson, "The Science Behind Why People Follow the Crowd," Psychology Today, May 24, 2017, https://www.psychologytoday.com/ca/blog/after-service/201705/the-science-behind-why-people-follow-the-crowd

Secretaria de Asuntos Municipales, "Presupuesto Participativo," Ministerio del Interior y Tranporte, https://www.mininterior.gov.ar/municipios/pdfs/SAM_04_presupuesto_participativo.pdf

Tiago Peixoto, "Participatory Budgeting: Seven Defining Characteristics," DemocracySpot, September 12, 2012, https://democracyspot.net/2012/09/12/participatory-budgeting-seven-defining-characteristics/

External Links

Official Website: https://presupuestoparticipativo.laplata.gob.ar/#/

Note

The original version of this case study first appeared on Vitalizing Democracy in 2010 and was a finalist for the 2011 Reinhard Mohn Prize. It was originally submitted by Tiago Peixoto.